Immigration. Travel. Living.

Croatia: cost of life

The population of Croatia is 4.3 million. Foreigners who come here are attracted by the pleasant climate and the clean Adriatic Sea.

The cost of living

The cost of living in Croatia is the average for Europe. Prices are higher here than in most Eastern European countries, but comparable to Spain and France. Average salaries (taxes included) range from € 580 to € 880 depending on the region, and the unemployment rate is 10.4%.

Work is not among the leading priorities for Croats, they always put family first, not a career. The office day here ends at 16.00 and after that, it is no longer acceptable to call on business issues.

Living expenses

Buying a property. The cost of housing in the country directly depends on the region of purchase. For example, in Dubrovnik a square meter will cost € 3,800 on average, in Zagreb and Sibenik – € 1,700 and € 1,600, respectively, in Pula – € 1,420. In Split, in the city center, they ask for about € 2,800 for a square meter. , and in residential areas – € 1,800. More affordable options are in Belovar and Slavonski Brod: € 880 and € 840, respectively.

You can also find very cheap options if it is not important for you to live in one of the central cities. For example, in Slavonia, houses are offered for € 7,000 – 10,000. However, this is the weakest region in the economic sense of Croatia: people leave here, and real estate is constantly falling in value.

Rental of property. As with the purchase, the rental price varies greatly depending on the city and area. For example, a small one-room apartment in Zagreb will cost € 265 per month in the dormitory part of the city and € 380 in the center. The most expensive is to rent an apartment in Dubrovnik – € 455 and € 370, respectively, slightly cheaper – in Split: € 355 and € 270. The cheapest offers of one-bedroom apartments are found in Osijek: on average, € 215 in the center and € 150 in residential areas.

To rent a two-room apartment in the center of Dubrovnik, expect about € 700, away from the main streets – € 480. In Zagreb, similar rates are about € 530 and € 370, in Split – € 470 and € 345, in Osijek – € 270 and € 200.

Communal payments. The cost of utilities (water, gas, heating, garbage disposal) is the average for Europe. For a studio or a small one-room apartment, get ready to pay about € 130 per month, for a two-room apartment – € 150, for a three-room apartment – € 170. Home Internet is paid additionally: unlimited package – about € 22 – 26 per month.

 

Transport and communication

Public transport. Croatia has a well-developed bus network, and trams are still running in some cities. Prices vary depending on the location, distance, and time of day (at night, travel costs 1.5 – 2 times more). For example, in Zagreb, a day ticket (valid for 90 minutes) for one zone costs € 0.75, for two zones – € 1.5, for three – € 2.2. A daily pass within one zone is € 2, and a monthly pass will cost € 43. A penalty of € 20 is imposed on travel without a ticket.

Intercity transport communication is also developed. The ticket price depends on distance. For example, to get from Zagreb to Split – prepare to pay € 20 – 23, from Split to Dubrovnik – € 13 – 15.

Taxi. Most cars run on a meter. Fares vary greatly in different parts of the country. For example, in the continental part, you will be charged about € 2.5 for landing, and € 0.8 – 0.9 for each kilometer of travel. In tourist areas, prices are 2-3 times higher. On holidays and weekends, as well as on weekdays from 22.00 to 5.00, 20% is added to the standard rates.

Car rent. To rent a car in Croatia, you need to be at least 21 years old and have a set of necessary documents: passport, credit card, driver’s license. Moreover, your driving experience must be at least three years. If you don’t have a credit card, get ready to leave a deposit of € 150 – 300.

The cost of one day of rent will cost € 30 – 40. Do not forget about paid parking (€ 4 – 10) and gasoline (€ 1.26 per liter). In the warm season, you can save money and use a bicycle instead of a car. Rent for a day will cost € 15.

people walking on concrete pathway

Mobile phone and internet

Prices for this cost item depend on the selected operator. For example, the most popular company in Croatia, T-Hrvatski, has a combo package for a month for 500 units (1 unit = 1 MB / 1 minute / 1 SMS) costs € 5, and for 5,000 units – € 9.3. At Tele2, a package for 3,000 MB + 2,000 minutes / SMS will cost the same € 9.3.

Almost all companies offer data-only SIM cards (no voice communication), as well as travel SIM cards. For example, from the Vip operator for € 10, you can take a package for 7 days with unlimited Internet and 100 minutes / SMS.

Food and clothing costs

Supermarkets. There are many chain supermarkets in Croatia: LIDL, Konzum, Mercator, Bio & bio, DM, INTERSPAR, TOMMY. On weekdays, shops are open from 8.00 to 22.00, on weekends – often until 14.00. Konzum and Mercator sell not only products but also a wide range of other goods: household appliances, clothing, interior items, etc. TOMMY is one of the most popular grocery chains due to its discounted prices.

Average food prices in Croatian supermarkets:

  • Milk (1 liter) – € 0.8,
  • Cheese – € 6 – 8
  • Cottage cheese (500 grams) – € 2
  • Sour cream (200 grams) – € 1.2
  • Beef – € 8 – 9
  • Chicken – € 4 – 7
  • Pork – € 4.5 – 6
  • Lamb – € 9 – 13
  • Sausage – € 2.5 – 20 (depending on the type)
  • Fish – € 4 – 10
  • Shrimps – € 9 – 20
  • Turkey – € 6 – 8
  • Bread – from € 0.5
  • Eggs (10 pieces) – € 1.5 – 2
  • Sugar (1 kg) – € 1
  • Rice (1 kg) – € 1.5
  • Olive oil (1 liter) – € 4.5 – 5
  • Wine – € 4 – 5
  • Beer (0.5l) – € 0.8 – 2
  • Water (1.5l) – € 0.8 – 0.9
  • Apples (1 kg) – € 1.1
  • Bananas (1 kg) – from € 1
  • Oranges, tangerines (1 kg) – € 1.3
  • Pears (1 kg) – € 2.5 – 3
  • Grapes (1 kg) – € 3
  • Cucumbers, eggplants (1 kg) – € 2.4
  • Tomatoes (1 kg) – € 1.3
  • Potatoes (1 kg) – from € 0.4
  • Onions (1 kg) – € 0.7

It is better to buy seafood in specialized fish shops. In order not to limit yourself in your choice, come to shop at 7 am. Here you will find:

  • Sardines, mussels, sprat – € 2 – 2.5
  • Seabass, dorado – € 16
  • Squids – € 10 – 20
  • Cuttlefish – € 10 – 11
  • Shrimps – € 10 – 20.

Fast food. The most budget-friendly option to eat out is to take snacks in fast-food restaurants and tents on the street. For example, a combo set at McDonald’s, consisting of fries, cola, and a hamburger, will cost € 4-5. Walking along the local streets, you can buy pastries for € 0.5, spring rolls up to € 2, and ice cream for dessert (a ball – from € 1).

Cafes and restaurants. The most affordable establishments are pastry shops and coffee shops. Here you can refresh yourself with various culinary delights combined with a hot drink:

  • Cakes – up to € 3 per piece
  • Pancakes – € 4
  • Croissants – from € 1.5
  • Coffee – from € 1
  • “Bela Kava” (coffee with a lot of milk) – about € 2
  • Tea – up to € 3

For a more serious meal, get ready to pay around € 20. “Fast” food like pizza or pasta will cost € 6, beer will cost € 2.5 – 3, and a snack in the form of a plate with prosciutto and cheese – € 10.

Prices in restaurants are even higher, but the range and variety of dishes are more impressive:

  • Soups – € 2.5 – 6
  • Grilled fish – € 14 – 16
  • Grilled meat – from € 7
  • Salads – from € 5
  • Risotto with seafood – € 10
  • Pasta – € 9 – 10
  • Chicken with vegetables – € 10 – 11
  • Fish plateau – from € 30

Clothes and footwear

The largest shopping centers are in big cities: Split, Zagreb, Dubrovnik. One of the most popular and large-scale shopping centers in the Croatian capital is the Central Capitol in the city center. There are over a hundred boutiques of Italian brands here. Also, while in Zagreb, you can look at Branimir Central, Nama, Avenue.

In Split, the largest shopping centers are in the old town. To find inexpensive youth clothing, visit the Scandal store. In addition, if you want a more diverse selection of brands, head to City Center One. On average, get ready to pay € 80 – 100 for jeans, € 30 – 45 for a branded dress, and from € 100 for high-quality shoes (leather shoes, sneakers).

The main shopping centers of Dubrovnik are Lapad and Branimir, and the Importanne shopping center is located in the area of ​​the railway station. In Budva and Igalo, which are located near Dubrovnik, you can buy relatively inexpensive leather goods.

If more reasonable prices are among the wishes, go to the open markets. In addition to inexpensive clothes and shoes, you can find fresh homemade products and various souvenirs here.

aerial view of buildings near ocean

The medicine

After joining the European Union, the level of medical care in Croatia has moved to a higher quality level. Healthcare subsidized by the state. But despite modern technologies and advanced equipment, the cost of services for residents is quite acceptable. For example, for a visit to the doctor you will have to pay € 25, and for the treatment of one tooth – € 40 – 60. There are health insurance policies that are mandatory for everyone who has been living in the country for more than three months.

Education

Croatia tuition fee for international students varies according to the level, university of choice, and field of study. However, undergraduates in the Humanities, Humanities, and Social Sciences should expect to get $ 878 and $ 2416.64 per year. They can be changed every year.

Tuition fees for engineering science courses should be around 3,300 per year, while science and medical sciences should be around 4,000 per year. Special tuition for each university for both graduate and undergraduate courses can be requested from the university you wish to enroll in.

Other expenses

If you have some free time, you can spend it at the gym (€ 30 – 40 per month), go to the cinema (€ 5 – 7), or go to see local attractions. Fortunately, most of the country’s beauty can be seen for free.

For example, visit the smallest city of Hum, where only 30 people live, but at the same time, there are many historical places. On the other hand, get to Ston with the Great Croatian Wall. Alternatively, soak up the unique Zlatni Rat beach, which changes its shape depending on the strength of the waves and the direction of the wind. By the way, there is no charge for entry to all municipal beaches.

Not far from Split are the Vranjak Caves, a tour of which will cost € 5.5. To admire Plitvice Lakes, prepare to pay € 11-15 per adult for one day depending on the season.

As a result

To live comfortably in a large Croatian city, renting a one-room apartment, not deny yourself the occasional visit to cafes and entertainment, but at the same time traveling by public transport – about € 750 – 850 will be required for a month.

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